Clearing the Air: What an HVAC Cleaner Should Really Do in Your Home

A typical home air conditioning unit.

(ARA) – Those statistics about indoor air pollution and it’s relation to respiratory problems convinced you it was time to get your heating, ventilation and air conditioning system (HVAC) cleaned. You were even looking forward to the increased energy efficiency that a clean system can provide. But $49 and one very noisy service call later, you’re still sneezing and you haven’t seen any dip in your energy bill.

What happened?

“A very low service charge may indicate the service provider isn’t performing a thorough cleaning and maintenance of your home’s entire HVAC system,” says Matt Mongiello, president of NADCA, the HVAC Inspection, Maintenance & Restoration Association. “He or she may have done nothing more than blow air through the ducts and clean off vent grills inside the home. A cleaning performed to NADCA standards – which are cited by the EPA as a best practice – encompasses much more than just the ductwork.”

HVAC companies are among the top 10 industries with the most complaints, according to the Better Business Bureau. So how can a homeowner know if a service provider is doing a good job, or just blowing hot air?

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10 Tips to Ensure Your Air Conditioner Is Ready Next Year

Central air conditioner unit, from left side

With the arrival of fall, many are turning off their cooling systems. But how can you make sure yours is ready to jump back into action next year? With the rising costs of fuel and the uncharacteristically hot summers throughout the U.S., it is more important than ever to extend the life of your home’s air conditioning unit. A high-quality heating ventilation and air conditioning system can last up to 20 years if properly installed and maintained. However, the cheapest models or poorly maintained systems can fail in as little as five. Here are 10 tips to make sure your air conditioner is ready for next year.

1. Make sure all weather stripping around doors and windows is properly sealed. As time goes by the caulking and weather stripping become compromised with use and temperature changes and the loss of the conditioned air can cause the air conditioner and heater to work longer to achieve the desired temperature.

2. Screening AC installers for professional credentials, experience and proper training is extremely important. If the unit has been installed improperly, the system may have leaky ducts or low air flow. Often, the level of refrigerant does not match the manufacturer’s specifications, which can affect efficiency and performance. Improper installation can lower a system’s efficiency by up to 30 percent.

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A Check-Up for Your Garage Door

Sectional-type overhead garage doors in the st...
Sectional-type overhead garage doors in the style of carriage house doors. They are steel with exterior cladding. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

As the American home has evolved over the years, so too has the garage—both in the way it looks as well as its newfound functionality as the main entranceway to the home. In fact, more than 70 percent of homeowners enter and exit their home through the garage door, relying on it as the new front door.

Since the garage door now plays such a key role in many homeowners’ daily lives, garage industry professionals, installers and leading manufacturers of garage doors and openers have teamed up to offer easy-to-follow tips for maintaining the safety and security of this access point, such as the following from LiftMaster:

  • Maintenance. To keep the garage door properly maintained and functioning safely, be sure to keep all moving parts of the door clean and lubricated, including the steel rollers.
  • Balance. To check balance, start with the door closed and pull the opener release mechanism so you can maneuver the door by hand. If the door is balanced (properly spring-loaded and running freely on its tracks), you should be able to lift the door smoothly without much effort and it should stay open about three or four feet above the floor.
  • Safety reverse. Since 1993, all automatic openers manufactured for the U.S. must include a safety reversing feature such as infrared sensors or “photo eyes.” These sensors are installed near the floor on either side of the garage door opening. Once the invisible laser beam between the two sensors is broken by an obstruction, the door reverses automatically. If your opener lacks a similar safety reversing feature, it’s time to get a new opener.
  • The six-inch rule. The photo eyes mentioned above should not be installed higher than six inches above the garage floor. If the eyes are installed higher, a person or pet could get under the beam and not be detected by the photo eyes.
  • Sensitive technology. Test your door’s sensitivity by placing a two-inch thick piece of wood or a roll of paper towels in the path of the door before closing it. If the garage door does not automatically reverse and retract back to the open position, then the opener needs to be adjusted or purchase a newer model that comes with photo eyes.
  • Prepare for weather. Be prepared as summer heat and storms turn to summer outages. Once power is lost to the home, an automatic garage door opener will also be impacted. Ensure your opener is equipped with a battery back-up system.

Source: LiftMaster